Hiding RSS Feed Count Experiment Results…

Hi all…

Experiment Failed Well, when I tried this experiment to hide the RSS feed count on my other major blog, I got a boost of 2 or 3 readers according to FeedBurner.

I now have 9 readers for my Lair of the Green Knight  RSS feed, which is more than I’ve had in the past (I tend to hover around 7).

So was this particular experiment a success? Not really. I’m going to leave the count hidden for now, as I don’t think it’ll hurt anything. More than anything else I think having the big RSS feed button in the top right of the blog makes it easier to subscribe than having to hunt for the link further down the blog.

There you have it. Hope everyone is having a great weekend!

–Fitz

Next Experiment… Hiding RSS Feed Count…

Hi there…

RSS feedsI recently read an article discussing whether blogs with a low feed count should hide their numbers because it may scare off new RSS subscribers. On my other blog I only have a handful of subscribers (tends to hover around 6-7), so I’ve decided to see if hiding the feed count makes a difference.

I’ll report my findings on this experiment in a few days (figure I’ll see if it changes anything).

What do you think? Will it make a difference? What do you do on your own blogs?

–Fitz

rssHugger… the hunt for more traffic…

Hey all…

Have you hugged your RSS feeds today?

rssHugger

Traffic is the killer for most of us in the blogosphere. There’s lots of ways to generate traffic. I’ve joined a number of blog networks, been working to establish community, and so on, like everyone else. But rssHugger is a new one on my radar, so I thought I’d give it a shot also.

According to the rssHugger website:

rssHugger is a unique website that aims to bring bloggers and readers together. rssHugger aims to provide blog owners with a unique easy-to-use way to promote their blogs by sending them traffic, building backlinks for search engine optimization, as well as attracting new rss subscribers if the content is interesting to the reader. rssHugger aims to help visitors be able to easily find blogs that write about subjects they are interested in. These subjects include: internet marketing, making money online, charity, sports, gambling, and many more. If the visitors find a blog that they had not previously heard about, they can easily add it to their RSS readers or bookmark it.

So the goal here is to get folks to see your feeds, which generates traffic and backlinks, which generates more traffic and back around again. So we’ll see if this works. I’ll let you know. 🙂

It appears that the entry used to be $10 plus a review of rssHugger on your site, but they have dropped the $10 charge to help out the little fish like myself. But you can skip that step and pay $20 to just join the network without the hassle of a review. (Personally a review is a minor thing, so I don’t mind.)

So let’s hope that this viral blog network is truly viral and I catch some of the benefit!

Thanks!

–Fitz

Do you Hubsess about things?

Hi all…

I recently found a new news aggregation site called Hubsess… It works similar to Bloglines or Google Reader or other online RSS feed readers, but has a more low-tech feel with the concept of “newspapers”. Though I’m not sure it will take off, it’s an interesting approach.

Hubsess Screenshot Tiny

Basically you create a “hub” for a person, place, or thing, and then relate your hub to other hubs, creating a network of hubs about particular topics.

According to their FAQ, what makes Hubsess different than other sites is:

Hubsess allows you to get the news you want, while skipping the news you don’t want. Hubsess gets news from two sources. Users can submit news stories, and tag them to hubs. Users can also submit an RSS feed and get Hubsess will automatically add stories from that RSS feed to a Hub’s news.

Hubsess allows ordinary people to write news stories on their blog, and submit them to Hubsess. This means that you no longer have to rely on traditional media sources for your your news.

Hubsess also allows you to vote on stories. Each story will have a score. That score will go up and down, depening on user’s votes. This score will help other users decide whether a story is a good read, or something they should pass on. Users also can discuss a story.

As far as I can tell, it’s not the most exciting site on the web, but another option when trying to make relationships with readers/viewers. I’m hoping that their interface gets much cleaner. It has a very old-fashioned web page kind of vibe to it, as opposed to Bloglines and Google Reader, which are both very Web 2.0.

Will this help or hinder your marketing efforts? Probably neither — it’s just one more site to be aware of on the edge of your radar.

Until next time! Keep blogging!

–Fitz